Radio engineering time travel - 1923

Radio engineering time travel (1923)

I invite you to look at the "pictures" related to radio technology. They come from various sources. The gallery has its sister version in Polish and Russian. Versions in other languages will be added successively. More detailed descriptions can be found in other language versions (articles are related and can be displayed by clicking on the icons with flags on the left, top of the TRIODA website). Of course, I will complement translations of signatures quite slowly. All descriptions are displayed using the present tense and not the past - this is not a mistake only deliberate action - a reference to the original descriptions from those years. In order not to delay the possibility of viewing the gallery, this site is made available as a "site under construction" - for which I apologize to all guests. At the beginning and end of each set of photographs there are links allowing to change the period - calendar year.

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 General View of KPH Receiving Station at Marshall, California
(Radio for January, 1923)

 
Listening -In at KPH
(Radio for January, 1923)


Transmitting Antenna System at Bolinas
(Radio for January, 1923)


Alexanderson High Frequency Alternators in the Interior of the Bolinas Station
(Radio for January, 1923)

 
1KW. Tube Set on S. S. "H. F. Alexander." is also equipped with 0.5KW. spark set. Tube Set Radiates 19 Amperes on 2100 Meters.
(Radio for January, 1923)


Front View and Rear View of Portable Radio Receiver
(Radio for January, 1923)

 


Front View and Rear View of Radio Frequency Amplifier
(Radio for January, 1923)

 
"Yes, this is KHJ, in operation. Input panel, transmitter panel and power panel, reading from left to right. KHJ, 500 watts, has done a great deal for Radio in the South-west since November Ist. Can you see the milliammeter readings? Somewhat indistinct. However, the antenna ammeter reads eight and five-tenths amps. "Uncle John," the bedtime story telling genius, and "Cousin Bill," the humorous news reader, are on the job in the studio, a beautifully furnished room with proper broadcast accoustice. This is just the instrument room. The back in the foreground belongs to G. C. Farmer."
(Radio for January, 1923)

 
The six arc -convertors of the San Francisco terminal.
(Radio for February, 1923)


Section of control board adjoining arc room, where the station engineer attends the arcs. He is now occupied at a local circuit through which he gets warning when an arc flutters.
(Radio for February, 1923)

 
Daly City receiving station. The five loops, and another loop not shown, are connected to six receiving sets inside, from which the head telephone leads are extended through buried conduit to the city offices far below.
(Radio for February, 1923)

 
Tuning inductances, relays, and signal control apparatus of one of the six transmitters. 
(Radio for February, 1923)


All these boys in the city office have to do is to see how fast they can telegraph. Two are sending and two receiving, There is a table like this for every two arcs. 
(Radio for February, 1923)


1,000 K.W. arc-convertor. The frame and field poles contain 100 tons of soft steel. A station on the Pacific coast for working the Orient is projected, which would employ one of these units, operated on an antenna 1,000 feet high, and expected radiation of 750 amperes.
(Radio for February, 1923)

 
Twenty -Watt Transmitter and Receivers at 6AQA
(Radio for February, 1923)

 
Radiophone Transmitter and Receiver at 8ALT. 
(Radio for February, 1923)

 
Transmitter Circuit at 8ALT (see above) using Tickler with Heising Modulation and either Speech Amplifier or Two Modulators.
(Radio for February, 1923)

 
PWX, Havana, Cuba, B. H. Wurm in Charge
(Radio for February, 1923)

 
Super- Heterodyne Set on Exhibit at New York Permanent Radio Fair
(Radio for March, 1923)

 
KPO Broadcast Room
(Radio for March, 1923)

 
KGW, the Radiophone Station of "The Oregonian," Portland, a 500 Watt, Western Electric Set. Reports of its reception have been received from 30 States, Five Canadian Provinces, Hawaiian Islands, and Remote Parts of Alaska. \
(Radio for March, 1923)

 
Dr. de Forest's Laboratory, Showing Projection Machine Used to Reproduce the Sound Phonofilm. The Weak Voice Currents Registered from the Film Are Magnified by the Vacuum Tubes in the Foreground
(Radio for April, 1923)

 
C. Francis Jenkins and His Radio Picture Transmitter, Showing Pictures as Received.
International Newsreel Photo
(Radio for April, 1923)

 
8ADG, Operated by Chas. H. Schrader, Utica, N. Y., Whose 100 -watt C. W. Works 6XAD
 (Radio for April, 1923)


3BLF, Richmond, Va.
 (Radio for April, 1923)

 
Aerial at KFI Supported by Roof. 96 ft. Steel Towers and 25 ft. Masts so as to be 175 ft. Above Ground.
(NEWS OF THE BROADCASTERS - THE NEW KFI
During the past summer Radio KFI, owned and operated by Earle C. Anthony Inc., was heard in practically every state in the union. But Mr. Anthony, the head of the firm and himself an enthusiastic radio fan, soon realized the increasing importance of radio broadcasting and, as a result of his foresight and large public spirit, the new KFI which went on the air on January 27th was installed.
The entire installation is Western Electric equipment and was installed by Western Electric and telephone company engineers. The antenna consists of four wires swung between two steel towers 175 ft. above the ground. It has a working length of 100 ft. The set itself is a standard Western Electric 500 watt transmitter with two 250 watt modulator tubes and two 250 watt oscillator tubes. It is housed in what is called the
Radio room off of which opens the generator and battery room.)

(Radio for April, 1923)


Radio Room at KFI
 (Radio for April, 1923)


Studio at KFI 
(In addition to the radio room the entire plant consists of a studio done in the Spanish style, a reception room for the convenience of
visitors and performers and an office where the details of operation are handled.)
(Radio for April, 1923)

 
General J. G. Harbord and David Sarnoff, respectively President and Vice President and General Manager of Radio Corporation of America, Having Their Voices Recorded on Pallophotophone
(Radio for April, 1923)

 
Members of Second National Radio Conference at Washington, D. C.
"The second National Radio Conference recommendations to the Secretary of Commerce mark a new era for the radio public. It recommended that the interference experienced by broadcasters and listeners be relieved by the opening up of a new wide band of waves by the Government and a new assignment of individual wave lengths to broadcasting stations. This is made possible by the opening up of what was previously government reserved waves and the shifting of certain ship waves out of the broadcasting wave bands. The Department of Commerce, acting under its present authority, will be able to establish and enforce the new regulations, and thus bring order in the radio world...."
(Radio for May, 21923)

 
The New 6ZW -6XAD Station Operated by Major Lawrence Mott
"From right to left: 200-watt combination fone & tel. set, with 4-50 watt GE tubes, and 1-WE -5 watt as a speech-amplifier. The big set, so adapted as to use a GE-250 watt -a WE -250 watt - a Mullard (British) 250 watt, or a Mullard 500 watt. The latter two are shown, hanging below panel, and the WE-250 is on table, at right. The GE-250 was in circuit at time of photograph taking. Meter- 110V -AC -to show, at all times, amount of V. from power house. Specially designed 4-way switch for throwing in to action any one of the 4 transmitters. One motion changes aerial, ground, (Switch designed by Stuart Dalton, 6KY, whose invaluable assistance and advice was used in making over station). Antenna switch...."
(Radio for May, 1923)

 
Radio Station 9AVC
(Radio for May, 1923)


Radio Station 8AB
(Radio for May, 1923)

 
The City's Music In Vacation Times
(Radio for June, 1923)

 
1.5 K.W. Tube Transmitter on S. S. "Majestic" showing Operator Brunt using "D. F." Radio Compass
(Radio for June, 1923)


Powel Crosley, Jr., President of the Crosley Manufacturing Company, dedicating the new 500 watt Western Electric radio broadcasting equipment at station WLW, Cincinnati
(Radio for June, 1923)

 
Interior View of New Broadcast Station Erected and Operated by Radio Corporation of America at Aeolian Hall on 42nd Street, New York City. Simultaneous Broadcasting on Two Wavelengths will be possible.
(Radio for June, 1923)

 
Radio Station 20M.
(Radio for June, 1923)

 
Radio Station 9BWI
(Radio for June, 1923)

 
D. C. Wallace, Owner and Operator of 9ZT, at the key.
(Radio for June, 1923)

 
A. W. Tupper, Assistant Engineer Bureau of Lighthouses, with Receiving Set.
(Radio for July, 1923)

 
Wash drawing of new broadcast station, showing studio and office building, the power station in the rear and the antenna; insert in center shows how the studio will look, and insert to right is portrait of Dr. Thomas Alddison, Pacific Coast Manager of the General Electric Company, who will supervise the operation of the station.
(Radio for July, 1923)

 
RADIO STATION 6ZE
Station 6ZE is owned and operated by Mr. D.B. McGown, U.S. Radio Inspector, Department of Commerce, at 1247 Forty-seventh Avenue, San Francisco, and is within a stone's throw of the Pacific Ocean. The picture shows the general appearance od the station's interior in a small, specially built radio-house, which is devoted to this exclusive service.
Starting at the left, we see the 100-watt tube set, which is connected with the reversed feedback circuit. This set is mounted on a separete table. A smaller set of 10 watts capacity is shown on the main operating desk, immediately next to the receiver. The latter is a specially built regenerative affair, the output of which is led to the three stage audio frequency amplifier directly above the receiving set; waves between 50 and 1000 meters can be received on this apparatus.
(Radio for July, 1923)

 
Radio Equipment on S.S. "Leviathan," Comprising Four Independent Transmitting and Receiving Outfits. The Main Transmitter is Equipped with Two 10 K. W. Tubes
(Radio for August, 1923)


 Radio Station WJAZ, Showing Antenna System, Transmitter and Crystal Studio
(Radio for August, 1923)

 
Control Equipment for 20KW Transmitter on S.S. "Leviathan."
(Radio for August, 1923)

 
Radio Central of the Office of Communications, U.S.N. at Washington, D. C., Showing the New Clarophone in the Rear
(Radio for September, 1923)

 
"Leviathan's" Transmitter, with Water - Cooled Vacuum Tubes and Enormous Condenser (Compared with Ordinary Mariable Condenser).
(Radio for September, 1923)

 
Radio Station 9US
(Radio for September, 1923)

 
Radio Station 9DGE
(Radio for September, 1923)


Dr. Louis Cohen, Major - General George O. Squier and Lieutenant - Colonel J. O. Mauborgne with Resonance Coil Wave Receiver
(Radio for October, 1923)

 
Westinghouse Carrier Wave Broadcasting Outfit
(Radio for October, 1923)

 
Radio 8YAE
"Radio Station 8YAE in the physics laboratory at Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, has been very active in relay work, and has often been reported on the Pacific coast. Reliable communication has been established with all districts in the United States and Canada with the 10 -watt transmitter shown in the picture. The transmitter is familiar to a large number of the west coast gang, as it was in operation at 6AWP in Santa Ana, Calif., last year. The 5-watt tubes are employed in a Colpitts circuit. The plate potential is supplied by an Acme 200 and "wrecked" by a twelve -jar rectifier with lead and aluminum plates in, a saturated solution of borax. The filter system consists of two 2-mfd. condensers and a 1.5 henry choke. Although the set has been made to operate very well as a radiophone, straight C. W. has been employed at this station. An antenna current of 1.8 to 2.0 is obtained on a wave of 220 meters; 500 volts at 100 mils on the plates and fils constant at 7.8 volts..."
(Radio for October, 1923)

 
Taki Yonemura, Radio Engineer, sole link between Japan and other lands when all other communication systems were destroyed.
(Radio for November, 1923)

 
Radio Station WSAI
Radio station WSAI is broadcasting on 309 meters from the plant of the U. S. Playing Card Co. at Cincinnati, Ohio. The transmitter is a standard Western Electric 500 -watt set and was reported from every state except Utah, Nevada and Idaho during the first four tests.
(Radio for November, 1923)

 
Radio Tractor Used to Communicate With Flying Airplanes During Army Tests at Panama
(Radio for December, 1923)

 
The Parisian Mystery
"After many months of mysterious transmissions, the "Mystery Set" of Paris has at last been located. And even now, it retains some of that enigmatic and puzzling atmosphere which envelops all mysteries. For fully a month, the mysterious transmitter, hidden somewhere in the big capital of France, baffled the efforts of the police, the military, and the amateurs, who all bent their energies toward its location. Yankee ingenuity, however, kept the radio field guessing, and it wasn't until a few weeks ago that the entire story of the "Zero Post" was revealed..."
(Radio for December, 1923)

 

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